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Sakura

Feminist. Alleged Despicable Strumpet. Won't take your shit.
Sep 16 '14

artsyartichoke:

Sarcasm level 10

Sep 16 '14
Sep 16 '14
Sep 16 '14

smitethepatriarchy:

ohhellothere9999:

journolist:

'We're a Movement Now': Fast Food Workers Strike in 150 Cities (NBC News)

Fast food workers walked off the job nationwide on Thursday, as police arrested dozens who engaged in civil disobedience. Organizers said workers in an estimated 150 cities were expected to take part in the strike, which they said marked an intensification of their two-year campaign to raise hourly pay in the industry to $15 and to win workers’ right to form a union. Organizers said dozens of workers had been arrested in cities including Kansas City, Detroit, and New York.

Fast-Food Workers Turn Up the Heat (In These Times)

“Paddy wagon’s on its way,” announced a Chicago Police tactical officer over his radio early this morning. Shortly thereafter, a crowd of about 300 demonstrators—including over 100 striking fast food workers—began chanting “Take the street!” and proceeded to do just that. Marching between a McDonald’s on one side of the road and a Burger King on the other, the crowd blocked 87th street traffic on Chicago’s south side for about 20 minutes. The action was the latest escalation in the fast-food workers’ campaign for a $15 minimum hourly wage and the right to form a union without retaliation. Two dozen workers proceeded to link arms and sit down in the road in an act of civil disobedience, prompting the police to take them away in handcuffs.

Hundreds of Fast-Food Workers Striking for Higher Wages Are Arrested (New York Times) 

Hundreds of fast-food workers and labor allies demanding a $15-an-hour wage were arrested in sit-ins around the country on Thursday, as the protesters used civil disobedience to call attention to their cause. Organizers said nearly 500 protesters were arrested in three dozen cities — including Chicago, Detroit, Las Vegas, New York and Little Rock, Ark. All told, the sit-ins took place in about 150 cities nationwide, the organizers said.

Arrests as Fast Food Workers Strike Across the Country for $15 an Hour (Newsweek)

Thousands of workers at fast food restaurants across the country went on strike Thursday, demanding better wages and the right to unionize without retaliation. Organizers said strikes would take place is around 150 cities and would include workers from McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, KFC, and more. In addition to the right to unionize, workers are demanding a $15 hourly wage. “There has to be civil disobedience because workers don’t see any other way to get $15 an hour and a union,” Kendall Fells, organizing director of the organizing group Fast Food Forward.

50 arrested in local fast-food wage protests (Chicago Tribune) 

Hundreds of fast-food workers held strikes and protests in Chicago and other U.S. cities Thursday, the latest step in their push for a $15 hourly wage. In the Chicago area, 50 were handcuffed and taken into custody in two separate events, one in the city’s Chatham neighborhood and one in Cicero. Cicero charged the protestors with disrupting traffic, a misdemeanor, while Chicago issued citations to the 19 it detained earlier in the day. The Fight for $15 campaign said that 436 fast-food workers had been arrested nationwide as of Thursday afternoon.

Police ticket, arrest 30 Detroit fast-food protesters (Detroit Free Press)

More than 100 demonstrators shut down an east-side Detroit intersection Thursday as part of a labor-organized national fast-food strike. Detroit police said they ticketed and released 24 demonstrators for disorderly conduct and another six arrested for outstanding traffic warrants. Officers said protesters sat in the roadway at Mack Avenue and Canyon and refused to leave. The protesters blocked traffic for about a half hour, police said. “They didn’t have to leave — they just had to get out of the roadway — and they refused,” said Detroit Assistant Police Chief Steve Dolunt. “As long as you’re peaceful, we’re good, but you can’t block the roadway.”

Little Rock police arrest 11 in McDonald’s wage protest (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)

Little Rock police on Thursday morning arrested 11 protesters demonstrating for higher pay for fast-food workers. Officers got a call from protesters about 8 a.m. and responded to ensure order. By that time, demonstrators were blocking the thoroughfare at Seventh and Broadway, eventually moving to Third and Broadway, where some were arrested. “To my understanding they are protesting the minimum-wage law,” Little Rock Police Department spokesman Lt. Sidney Allen said in an emailed statement. About 50 to 60 were demonstrating peacefully, Allen said.

Fast-food protests lead to 8 arrests in Wilkinsburg (Pittsburgh Business Times) 

A strike by fast-food workers seeking $15 an hour in pay has resulted in arrests in front of a McDonald’s restaurant in Wilkinsburg. Kyndall Mason, a spokesperson for One Pittsburgh, a labor support organization that’s been working with fast-food workers in their ongoing fight for higher wages in the region, said that eight protesters were arrested Thursday when they sat down on Penn Avenue in front of the restaurant, disrupting traffic. “They were arrested and taken away,” said Mason, who participated in the strike, which she said started at 5:30 a.m. “The rest of the crowd was dispersed.”

Five arrested in Houston fast food wages protest (Houston Chronicle) 

Five protesters were arrested Thursday afternoon in front of a McDonalds in Southwest Houston as part of a one-day protest in 150 cities to boost the minimum wage of fast food workers to $15 an hour. In a scene that has become increasingly familiar, Houston police were standing nearly with an armful of handcuffs and as soon as the protesters flooded into the intersection and sat down in the middle of the roadway, the police began making the arrests.

Three arrested at Denver protest outside McDonald’s (Denver Post)

Three people were arrested Thursday for blocking traffic during a demonstration in favor of paying fast-food workers $15 an hour. McDonald’s worker Christian Medina, the Rev. Patrick Demmer, the senior pastor at Graham Memorial Community Church of God in Christ, and college student Tucker Plumlee sat down in crosswalk on busy Colfax Avenue during a lunchtime protest outside a McDonald’s. They were taken into custody to cheers from around 100 protesters after police warned that they would be arrested if they refused to leave.

Fast food workers strike outside McDonald’s in Gretna, kicking off day of demonstrations (New Orleans Times-Picayune)

At 29 years old, Shaunta Richardson looks back at more than a decade of working in the fast food industry, starting when she was 16. Richardson, a Burger King cook who moved back to New Orleans from Texas this year after fleeing Hurricane Katrina nine years ago, said something is familiar between her teenage years and today — the numbers behind the dollar sign on pay day. “It seems like the checks look the same from then, to now,” Richardson said Thursday morning. Richardson joined in a rally outside McDonald’s in Gretna early Thursday morning, as strikes, demonstrations and acts of civil disobedience unfolded nationwide, part of the “Fight for $15” movement seeking $15-per-hour for fast food workers and the right to unionize, without fear of retaliation.

Charlotte fast-food workers join national protest (Charlotte Observer)

Priscilla Hoyle says she is raising her three children in a hotel room. When she’s not working three days a week at Bojangles’, she supplements her income by asking strangers for money, she said. “The only thing I can do is get out here and panhandle just to keep a roof over my children’s heads,” said Hoyle, 22. On Thursday, she joined about 20 Charlotte fast-food workers who walked off their jobs and demanded higher wages as part of a national push that featured protests in dozens of cities. 

Solidarity protest in Cleveland with home health aides leading effort (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

Customers got a little something extra when they ordered from the breakfast menu at a local McDonald’s on Thursday morning. Well, the super-size portion of protest wasn’t exactly on the menu. Still, it was offered — for free — beginning at 6 a.m. to anyone within earshot of the McDonald’s on St. Clair Avenue, near East 105 Street, in the city’s Glenville neighborhood. Cleveland was one of more than 100 cities participating in the latest effort to get a $15 minimum wage for fast-food workers. Supporters in Cleveland protested in solidarity with those holding strikes for higher wages in other cities. This is Cleveland’s third protest since 2013.

Fast-food workers stage national protests for better pay (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) 

Protestors march up Ponce de Leon Avenue on the way to protest in front of a McDonald’s restaurant. Ten people were arrested for blocking Ponce de Leon Ave. as protestors participated in a nationwide protest and strike for better pay near a McDonald’s in Atlanta, Thursday afternoon September 4, 2014. Calling for higher pay and the right to form a union without retaliation, fast-food chain workers and community supporters protested as part of a wave of strikes and protests in 150 cities across the U.S.

Labor’s New Groove: Taking the Struggle From Streets to Legislatures (The American Prospect)

The campaigns for minimum-wage raises aren’t confined to Democratic strongholds, however. Initiatives that would raise the state minimum wage are on November’s ballots in Arkansas and Alaska, where they may produce the kind of working-class turnout that would help the re-election bids of Democratic Senators Mark Pryor and Mark Begich, respectively. That’s largely why Democrats gathered signatures to put the measures on the ballot. But no such Democratic strategy is responsible for the presence of such an initiative on Nebraska’s ballot this November. Quite apart from political calculation, it seems a fair number of Nebraskans just believe it’s time for a raise. Similarly, in Kentucky, a measure to enact a minimum wage ordinance is before the Louisville City Council, where it’s favored to pass.

Why Labor Matters in the Fight for Racial Justice (In These Times)

This was a period when black workers still were relegated to the most dirty, dangerous and grueling positions in industry. They were frozen out of transfers and promotions to what were considered white men’s jobs, even at union plants. But, as Fred says, “Even the worst union in the world is the best for black folks.” He explains, “For the first time, you were in an environment where you could speak against the union and against the company.” In the union, black workers had the power of collective voice, and they used it to change the union itself.

Why I Support the Fast-Food Workers Strike (The Nation)

In Washington, the agenda of corporations too often trumps the agenda of America’s middle class. Corporate leaders call and politicians answer. But when the working class calls to tell its representatives about the jobs that have disappeared because of bad trade deals or the paychecks that are smaller than they were twenty years ago, no one answers. Workers have stopped calling. They know the only way politicians see the light is if they feel the heat. Today, thousands of fast-food workers will be out in the street demanding a higher wage, dignity and the opportunity for a better life. They’re doing it because they have families to feed, parents to look after and basic needs that can’t be met at $7.25 an hour.

Photos: 1 (Source); 2 (Source); 3 (Source); 4 (Source); 5 (Source); 6 (Source

THERE’S MINIMUM WAGE JOBS FOR A REASON PEOPLE. You honestly want to pay someone $15 an hour to flip a damn patty? Disgusting. Here’s an idea: GET OFF YOUR LAZY ASSES AND A GET AN EDUCATION.

Okay can I borrow $80,000 then?

Sep 16 '14
melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

melissaannandthecool:

Just a reminder

Sep 16 '14

geminiio:

i need ferguson to go down in history books. i need school children in the year 2074 to learn about michael brown being shot on august 9th, 2014 by officer darren wilson. i need this to spark a movement. this can not lose the focus of society a mere month after it happened. 

Sep 16 '14
deviatedanddope:

king-emare:


jcoleknowsbest:

revolutionary-mindset:

Gone but not forgotten 😔 #NeverForget #RedSummerOf2014

the short list

^^^^^


All within a month tho…that’s unacceptable.

deviatedanddope:

king-emare:

jcoleknowsbest:

revolutionary-mindset:

Gone but not forgotten 😔 #NeverForget #RedSummerOf2014

the short list

^^^^^

All within a month tho…that’s unacceptable.

Sep 16 '14
princesszach:

yochevedke:

confessionsofayoungsexworker:

This guy sent me a dick pic so I google searched and sent back a bigger dick pic. This was the response.

This is beautiful

“A boy sends you an unsolicited dick pic… send back a picture of a better looking dick. … A more photogenic dick. A dick with a future.”
Sep 16 '14
peggys-magic-sex-feet:

the greatest thing is when antifeminists prove my point

peggys-magic-sex-feet:

the greatest thing is when antifeminists prove my point

Sep 16 '14
dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:


biyuti:


girljanitor:


dumbthingswhitepplsay:


popca:


dolgematki:


nativevoice:


“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 
IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.
A case of ginger ale: $82.
Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.
Read more: http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/Canada/20120608/inuit-food-prices-protest-120608/#ixzz1xKWAJkGe


Holy hell.


WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.


ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross
64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.
Conservationists
have been starving
these people
to death for years.


Reblogging for the extra articles. 
Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 


Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.


This is really fucking important.
This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.
It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.
The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.
Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.
There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

dirtybrian:

thewitchylibrarian:

dirtybrian:

mattachinereview:

biyuti:

girljanitor:

dumbthingswhitepplsay:

popca:

dolgematki:

nativevoice:

“Stop sending expired food”….”fried chicken 64.99” 

IQALUIT, Nunavut — A head of cabbage for $20. Fifteen bucks for a small bag of apples.

A case of ginger ale: $82.

Fed up and frustrated by sky-high food prices and concerned over widespread hunger in their communities, thousands of Inuit have spent weeks posting pictures and price tags from their local grocery stores to a Facebook site called Feed My Family.

Holy hell.

WHAT IN THE FUCK? This shit is not okay.

ughhslfkajsdlf gross gross gross

64.99?????


These people are starving for a reason.

Conservationists

have been starving

these people

to death for years.

Reblogging for the extra articles. 

Also… I might show up to this protest and support them. 

Pay attention to this stuff, please, followers who haven’t heard about this!  This kind of thing is completely erased in news media.

This is really fucking important.

This is why I don’t respect anyone who blindly supports the anti-sealing protestors. Because for a lot of people, it’s the only affordable option.

It’s not just Iqaluit. In Nain, Labrador this problem has been going on for ages and nobody does anything about it. $47 for a ham and $17 for a block of cheese. In Rigolet, Labrador, a loaf of bread costs $7. Here’s another picture of an Iqaluit food price changing before your very eyes.

The NNCP is starving people, reducing their food choices, and keeping people on EI poor. This is so, so wrong.

How can we help? I joined the group and checked out the website, but I didn’t see anything that can be actively done (other than raising awareness, which, of course, is great).

Excellent question! If you read through the group (which is here, for anyone who missed it), there are people talking about some ways to help.

  • Look at the latest news on the Feeding My Family website to see what the priorities are and how you might be able to help.
  • If you’re Canadian, call your local MP and ask to discuss this issue and express your concern.
  • Look up ways to support putting pressure onto airlines to charge fair rates (a $1000 plane ticket should be from one coast to the other, not a few hundred miles).
  • Research and learn what you can about food sustainability. For a start, how about learning square foot/metre (French intensive) gardening or container gardening and starting to practice it yourself? Share these techniques with friends and family. Get good at it so you can teach them to others who have poor food security in your own area.
  • For the love of God, stop signing “anti-sealing”/”anti-hunting” petitions and supporting Greenpeace’s actions without understanding the complicated, nuanced situation in the North.
  • Watch the FB group, because people there mention direct donations and ways to help the organizations actually on the ground there.
  • For example, one person is starting up a donation project/fundraiser.
  • Look at what organizations like FoodShare are doing and support them.

There is so much to be done. Sharing news articles and stories, lists of resources, donation and fundraising pages, and knowledge about food security is critical, but there’s a lot more work of all sorts.

(Source: )